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SelectOne Blog

5 Ways to Treat Your Employees Like Customers

Posted by SelectOne

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You know the saying “happy wife, happy life”? Well the same concept can apply to your business. The happier your employees, the better the performance of your company. The trick? Treat your employees as though they are your customers. After all, employees are the key to your company’s success. If they are not happy, how will that translate to your customers?

When employees feel they are undervalued, they can become stressed, underperform, and are less likely to go the extra mile when needed. By incorporating the following five philosophies into your business culture, you’ll see happier employees, which could lead to an increase in productivity, loyalty, recommendation rates, and more. 

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Topics: Workplace

5 Tips to Achieve an Accountable Workplace

Posted by Katie Whiting

Accountability is a buzzword that is used regularly in today’s professional environment. But what does it mean and how can we achieve it?

At a very basic level, accountability is having to answer for one’s actions. In the workplace, accountability is defined as employees behaving in a certain manner knowing in advance that they will have to explain themselves and that their actions have consequences. 

There is no exact formula for fostering an environment of accountability. There are, however, a few tips that can help get your company moving in the right direction – including:

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Topics: Workplace

7 Etiquette Tips for Successful Employee Reviews

Posted by Kevin Kerl

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Here’s a great example of how NOT to conduct an employee review, from the TV show “The Office.” In the Season 2 episode, Dunder Mifflin manager, Michael Scott, uses his employee performance reviews to solicit advice on improving his relationship with his boss, Jan. He’s so focused on his own issues, that he doesn’t give adequate feedback on his employee’s performance, and instead gives a curt (bordering on rude) review of employee Dwight Schrute’s performance: “Your performance has been adequate. You may leave. Goodbye.”

While it was good for a laugh, achieving great employee reviews means doing your research, being honest but upbeat and always keeping the company’s interests in mind. And etiquette matters—always.

These seven etiquette tips for successful employee reviews can help guide managers or executives to better establish employee relations and a positive office environment.

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Topics: Career Advice

Top 10 Things Developers Value in the Workplace

Posted by Marissa Malone

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The demand for developers is at an all time high and in order to attract and retain the top tech talent, it’s important for employers to understand what developers value in the workplace. 

According to Stack Overflow’s 2016 Global report, Developer Hiring Landscape, 62.8% of developers are passive candidates. This is great for companies looking to acquire new talent but a bit concerning for those trying to retain their top performers.

To better understand what developers are looking for, here are the top 10 things they value in the workplace and easy ways for you to incorporate them in your culture. 

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Topics: Workplace

Combating Age Discrimination: Too Young or Too Old to Hire

Posted by Jason Weber

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As recruiters we’re the first point of contact with the candidate often dealing with a multitude of scenarios and challenges. I’ve always been of the mindset that recruiters need to build rapport with their candidates, get to know them, and find out what’s important to them. They’re entrusting their livelihoods to us and in return we provide insight, customer service, serve as a sounding board, and last but not least HONESTY.

One of the greatest challenges I face is how to be honest with someone I’ve gotten to know over the years and tell them they’re not the right fit for a job due to their age?

Well, of course (legally) I can’t. It’s a huge obstacle to navigate around when companies have strict guidelines specific to the amount or type of experience required. In today’s marketplace it’s an unfortunate part of reality, but age discrimination still exists.  

For example:

  • Company A want to hire someone earlier along in their career and not take someone who might retire in the next 7-10 years.
  • Company B won’t take a new grad because they have no time to train them and they need someone with experience in a particular software, even though that new grad is a whiz with technology.

An argument can be made for both sides, but what companies don't recognize is how the "too old" and "too young" stereotypes are restricting their ability to build a world class team. Here's how to combat age discrimination and some guidance for what to look for when vetting the best candidates. 

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Topics: Hiring Strategies

Driving Your Way to Positive Energy

Posted by SelectOne

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If you’re looking for a light and easy read that will re-energize your soul, “The Energy Bus,” written by Jon Gordon will do the trick!

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Topics: Workplace

How to Look Beyond a Lousy Job Title [INFOGRAPHIC]

Posted by Molly Hastrich

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Many candidates that we work with turn down the chance to explore new opportunities simply based on the job title. There are several factors to consider when exploring new careers and job titles.

Each year, Pearl Meyer & Partners, a compensation consultancy based in New York City, publishes a study of job titling practices. In their most recent study, they found that 80% of companies surveyed use job titles to accurately reflect the corporate hierarchy, however, only 37% use the job title to attract prospective employees.

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Topics: Career Advice

Employers Guide to Mastering the Interview Process

Posted by SelectOne

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If you are a business owner, executive, hiring manager, or human resource professional, chances are you have heard the term or are familiar with Behavioral Interviewing (BI). 

Many companies are using BI to help them identify the best candidates during their interview process for key talent at their company. The reasons to use BI are many, but at heart, companies are using it since it is a great way to identify the best candidates that can help their companies grow.

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Topics: Hiring Strategies

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